Kitamae Yokocho in Sakata Yamagata Prefecture

Kitamae Yokocho food village in Sakata

Kitamae Yokocho (alleyway) in Sakata Yamagata Prefecture is a food village in the Nakamichi District opened by young chefs in Sakata. At the food village there are many small izakaya’s (drinks and shared inexpensive food). This is a place where locals eat and they serve yakitori, ramen, and other izakaya-style food. On the weekends you can also listen to music.

https://sakatacity.com/

Container Ship

Taken in 2013

Container ships are cargo ships that carries it’s load on truck size intermodal containers which is how the world moves most commerce like agricultural produce, electronic products, and other consumer goods. It has been said that 90% of non-bulk cargo is sent by container ships. In the early days most ship cargo was carried by bulk like grain or coal in the ships cargo hold. But in 1956 the first early container ships were built and have evolved ever since. The container ships are a slower mode of transportation and travel at a speed of 16–25 knots (30–46 km/h). Today some of the largest container ships are 399 meters (1,312 feet) in length and beam 61.5 meters (202 feet). Unfortunately the growing size of container ships, as well as, the high demand of products and inadequate financial seaport structure and organization have caused huge backlogs of products and goods worldwide.

Taisho-Roman Street Kawagoe

Taisho-Roman Street Kawagoe 2019

You can enjoy the retro atmosphere with Machiyazukuri (old merchant-house architecture) and western signs of the Taisho period at Taisho-Roman Street in Kawagoe, Japan. There are some merchant houses that date back to the Edo Period in the early 20th century and also many new merchants like cafes, sweet shops, and restaurants. The streets of Taisho-Roman Street are made of granite stone pathways. Kawagoe is also called Little Edo because of many 1603-1868 buildings and they are used in Japanese television dramas and movies. Rail access to Kawagoe: Tobu Tojo Line (From Ikebukuro to Kawagoe) Express 31 minutes, 450 yen. Seibu Shinjuku Line (Seibu Shinjuku to Kawagoe) Limited Express 43 minutes,890 yen. JR Kawagoe Line (Shinjuku to Kawagoe) Local 60 minutes, 760 yen.

https://www.koedo.or.jp/foreign/english/

Cat Mural

Painted by Roan Victor, a painter, muralist, educator, & cat lover

This photograph was taken in front of the Dancing Cat, an open and cage-free environment of formally homeless adult cats that hopefully find a new home with families. The Dancing Cat is a non-profit organization cat adaption lounge based in downtown San Jose. It’s purpose is to find homes for at-risk adult cats from the San José Animal Care Center in a cage-less environment where they can socialize with people and other cats and eventually find a new home. When visiting you only need to pay $10 for one hour to socialize with the cats. The Dancing Cat is mostly run by volunteers and generous donations in the community.

https://www.thedancingcat.org/

Asukayama Park Tokyo

Asukayama Park in Kita-ku Tokyo

Asukayama Park is a public park near Oji station in Kita-ku in Northern Tokyo. It is known for Cherry Blossom viewing during the beginning of Springtime with over 600 Japanese cherry trees. It’s history started during the 18th century, when, shogun Yoshimune Tokugawa (1684-1751) built the premises for Edo’s (Tokyo) population. It was one of first public parks in Tokyo. In addition, one can watch the JR Keihin-Tohoku and the Tohoku Shinkansen pass by from the pedestrian crosswalk near the South exit of the Oji Station. To access Asukuyama Park get off at either 1. Oji Station: JR Keihin-Tohoku Line or Tokyo Metro Namboku Line 2. Asukayama Station: Toden Arakawa Line 3. Oji-Ekimae Station: Toden Arakawa Line.

Turkey Vulture

Turkey Vulture photograph taken on the Alviso Slough Trail at the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Alviso (San Jose) August 2021.

Turkey Vultures are fairly large birds with long, broad wings. Their colors are dark brown with a featherless red head and pale bill. They are graceful but unsteady soarers and fly low to the ground and have a great sense of smell. Turkey Vultures are scavengers and can be seen at roadsides, farm fields, countryside, and landfills. They help clean the environment by eating flesh off dead animals before they decay. Researchers have noted that turkey vultures can travel 200 miles a day. Their life span is up to 24 years old and they live in Southern, Canada, North America, and South America.